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Alcohol Addiction Treatment in Albuquerque

Is Alcohol Considered a Drug?

Many have made the argument that alcohol is not a drug. This, in fact, cannot be more untrue. Alcohol is a drug, and an incredibly dangerous one at that. Long-term alcohol abuse affects virtually every organ system leading to significant, irreversible health complications and in more severe cases, can lead to death.

According to the New Mexico Department of Health, New Mexico's total alcohol-related fatalities have been growing consistently at nearly twice the national rate over the past 20 years. These fatalities, including motor vehicle crashes, chronic liver disease, poisonings, homicides, suicides, and other deadly bodily injuries just goes to prove how dangerous alcohol really is.

Identifying Alcoholism:

Many individuals struggling with alcoholism are usually pretty easy to spot. Whether it's the homeless man drunkenly stumbling down the sidewalk clutching his bottle of Jack Daniels camouflaged in a brown paper bag, or that belligerent woman at the local dive bar blacked out in a hysterical rage.

Having said this, there are also many individuals out there suffering with alcoholism that are not so easy to spot. It could be your neighbor, best friend, sibling, co-worker, or even you.

One may ask themselves, "How do I know if I'm an alcoholic?" For many of those who don't display the obvious warning signs, this may seem like a difficult question to answer. If you or your loved one answers "yes" to at least four of the questions below, then you or your loved one may indeed have a drinking problem and may require immediate help.

  1. Have you ever decided to stop drinking for a week or so, but only lasted for a couple of days?
  1. Do you wish people would mind their own business about your drinking-- stop telling you what to do?
  1. Have you ever switched from one kind of drink to another in the hope that this would keep you from getting drunk?
  1. Have you had to have an eye-opener upon awakening during the past year?
  1. Do you envy people who can drink without getting into trouble?
  1. Have you had problems connected with drinking during the past year?
  1. Has your drinking caused trouble at home?
  1. Do you ever try to get "extra" drinks at a party because you do not get enough?
  1. Do you tell yourself you can stop drinking any time you want to, even though you keep getting drunk when you don't mean to?
  1. Have you missed days of work or school because of drinking?
  1. Do you have "blackouts"?
  1. Have you ever felt that your life would be better if you did not drink?

Alcohol Withdrawal and Detox:

Alcohol withdrawal is one of the few drug withdrawals that are potentially life-threatening, in which it can lead to the development of seizures or delirium tremens (or DT's). DT's are characterized by high fever, rapid heartbeat, and confusion which can begin as early as just a few hours after an alcohol abuser's last drink.

Individuals who drink heavily and consistently for years, months, or even weeks will experience alcohol withdrawal when they either stop drinking entirely (quitting "cold turkey") or drastically reduce alcohol consumption.

Alcohol detox is the first step in the alcohol abuse treatment process. Programs typically offer specific medications to ease the plight of withdrawal symptoms to ensure that the individual is both safe and comfortable.

Guaranteeing that these methods serve to assist the individual throughout the detox process makes the world of difference when embarking on the road to recovery. After the alcohol has left the body, the individual can then begin the treatment program.

Support is paramount towards a successful recovery; therefore, dealing with detox alone cannot only be fatal, but will most likely result in a relapse. Don't endure this enormous hurdle alone. Call now!

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